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7.3.2 Employee motivation and empowerment

Discussion in 'IATF 16949:2016 - Automotive Quality Systems' started by Renata Osborne, Oct 16, 2019.

  1. Renata Osborne

    Renata Osborne New Member

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    Can someone provide an example of how you "maintain a documented process(es) to motivate employees to achieve quality objectives, to make continual improvements, and to create an environment that promotes innovation."
     
  2. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Renata: What do you do currently? Anything regarding these things?
     
  3. Renata Osborne

    Renata Osborne New Member

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    We do lots of activities and events focused on quality/continual improvement and motivation. I am just sure what an auditor would want to see to meet "documented process".
     
  4. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Always a challenge, for sure. It's actually not what the auditor expects/wants to see. It's what you can show and demonstrates works for your organization, including if the people understand why it's there and how they make a contribution. Document in your written procedure(s)/process map(s) etc what you do. You have to have a Process Owner assigned to this, so have them confidently explain to the auditor what the process is, how it meets the IATF requirements and the results it delivers to your organization. The auditor will be blown away. If they aren't, they shouldn't be auditing and you can show them the door!
     
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  5. Golfman25

    Golfman25 Well-Known Member

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    I think you can just make a list of what you do to achieve employee motivation. Update and review as necessary.
     
  6. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    That's not what IATF says you are required to have, in 7.3.2. A list isn't a process, which is characterized by inputs, outputs and controls. Having a list (only) is going to cause a non-conformity with an auditor who has read and understands the requirement.
     
  7. Golfman25

    Golfman25 Well-Known Member

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    But for the fact that you can document your "process" how you want. I would choose not to over complicate it.
     
  8. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Agreed. I would always caution that when people come here looking for an answer to "what an auditor wants to see", is that the answer is IN the IATF requirements. What passes a specific audit(or) as compliant cannot and shouldn't be taken as always meeting the requirements nor being found acceptable to other auditors. The aim of a Certified QMS isn't to document something which "gets by" a CB auditor. Such a practice is risky, experience shows...

    ISO 9001:2015 describes the requirement for processes needed by the organization and that inputs, outputs etc be included. A "list", while simple, is unlikely to be acceptable as a means to meet this - or any other - requirement.
     
  9. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

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    FWIW...this was hanging in my bosses office...
     

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  10. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    :eek:;)
     
  11. tony s

    tony s Well-Known Member

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    In many instances a documented procedure describing your organization's approach in motivating employees to achieve quality objectives, making improvements and creating environment that promotes innovation.

    Documented procedures, including the associated forms and tools, for the following approaches can satisfy 7.3.2:
    • 8D approach in problem solving;
    • Kaizen programs;
    • Quality Circles or Work Improvement Teams;
    • Incentive programs;
    • 5S programs with awards;
    • Suggestion schemes;
    • Employee of the month recognition;
    • Performance-based bonuses, etc.
     
  12. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

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    Sigh...what ever happened to just having a friendly workplace with everyone pointed the same direction?
    Why does everything have to be systematized?
    The only things that ever motivated me were (1) a common vision and (2) my paycheck. Everything on this list simply p*sses me off...(except tony s who I think is great).
     
  13. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    Why not ask the employees themselves? Stop guessing.They are internal customers, yes?
     
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  14. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

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    Aauuugggghhhh..... Oh please stop with the system-speak... they are not internal customers, they are your team-mates working with you to achieve a goal.
    Why or when did these silly systems become our bosses...? What ever happened to plain truth?

    sigh...rant over, sorry...
    According to the overriding system who is indeed boss of us all and managed by the Illuminati, they are indeed your "internal customers". Silly me. And here I thought they were my friends...
     
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  15. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    Eric, they can be your friends but the standard is asking for "maintain[ing] a documented process(es) to motivate employees to achieve quality objectives, to make continual improvements, and to create an environment that promotes innovation."

    I used the term internal customers because the first step of plan, do, check, act (process) is to figure out what they want. What do they require in order to achieve quality objectives, etc., and what it would take to increase willingness to do the right thing (motivation).
    Plan: Once finding out what they want (ask them, but please don't just send out surveys because most of us hate them) the organization's leaders consider the options, their risks and potential benefits, and business needs. Prepare to implement the things that were decided upon.
    Do: Carry out the plans
    Check: Ask the employees if the changes had the desired effect. Balance this with results such as defect rate, customer satisfaction etc.
    Act: If changes are needed or the leadership decides to go further, repeat starting at Plan.

    The standard asks for a documented process, but does not say "documented procedure." Keep documentation of this process throughout its cycle and you should do fine.

    I hope this helps!
     
  16. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    I struggle with this "concept". It's too pink and fuzzy (like a lot of TQM philosophies, impractical). Unlike true customers, co-workers don't pay for the work we do which is passed on to them. They have no options to be "satisfied" or unsatisfied - because their needs and expectations were/weren't met. Work isn't about relationships and it isn't a democracy (unless you work for Google or similar). What's actually needed is robust, understandable and deployable processes which are effectively communicated and help us achieve the objectives of the organization. Treating co-workers as customers is bizarre.
     
  17. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    Just to clarify why I use these terms:
    Organizations that pursue employee satisfaction may disagree that employees have no options to be "satisfied" or unsatisfied because their needs and expectations were/weren't met. When the standard asks for a process to address motivation, in my view arguing about whether or not we have relationships at work is distracting. Let us focus on the process please.
     
  18. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

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    It's all good, Jennifer...I was just venting a little.
    One can focus on the beneficial effect of having motivated employees...or one can focus on long term profitability, and realize that long term profitability is increased when employees are motivated instead of surly and annoyed.

    I cannot disagree that employee motivation is an important thing...it is...but I do not see the link between motivation and business performance highlighted often...simply employee motivation in and of itself. That's what I was venting a little about, not disagreeing with the sub-concept.

    One (me) wonders why the standard does not ask for "documentation of means of employee motivation and effect on improving business systems toward profit" instead...but no, it just asks for motivation process. IMO, one always has to tie the "Plan" to the "Purpose" else you'll quickly be in the weeds...and employee motivation is not the purpose, it is part of the plan.
     
  19. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    Eric, it is not easy to draw a positive correlation line between motivation and customer satisfaction/defects/quality goals. It is probably easiest in customer service fields, where behavior has a direct effect.

    But we could argue that personal motivation is a factor in manufacturing processes too, that is willingly and earnestly trying to do the right thing. How to get there is a puzzle that would solve a lot of companies very large turnover costs, as well as the risk of getting things wrong while new people are introduced to the process.

    Motivation is not new. McGregor's X and Y theory has been in quality management handbooks for some time. (I have no affiliation with MindTools) We could argue the merits of McGregor's X and Y theory, but it certainly appears the Technical Committee for TS-16949 has embraced the concept that personally motivated employees achieve better results in terms of outcomes, especially since craftsmanship arguably plays a role in so much of what transpires when producing automotive components/assemblies. Since automotive is such a high risk field, it seems they were willing to climb on to the idea that people who wanted to perform well were more inclined to do so.
     
  20. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

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    Please understand...I am not disagreeing. With the above quote, there would be no argument at all...personal motivation is absolutely and directly related to manufacturing processes. Annoyed people both make more mistakes, look more often for shortcuts, and take more "handling" by management...all of which are direct ties to profit (rework time&cost, lower quality and extra mgmt time and expense respectively).
    I guess it just makes more sense to me to keep the focus on the results (FTQ, compliance with customer approved procedures, lowering mgmt expenses respectively) than to "proceduralize" one of the causes.
    I see (and have seen for quite some time) more and more burden placed on businesses outside, and distracting to, the product realization process. This is just the one that I reacted to.

    Personal preference perhaps...no huge deal...just stuck in my craw sideways last Thursday I guess. It's scabbed over now.
     

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