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What to do?

Discussion in 'Coffee Break and Community Discussion Forum' started by MP480, Mar 22, 2017.

?

Should I?

  1. Talk to my Manager

    1 vote(s)
    12.5%
  2. Talk to HR

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Sit in dread

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Look for a new opportunity

    7 vote(s)
    87.5%
  1. MP480

    MP480 Member

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    Hello all,

    I'm in a sticky situation and I'm not sure what to do. Wanted to see what your thoughts and opinions were regarding this matter.

    I started at my company back last summer (July) as the QA Manager. They had previously not had any quality person. The GM and another manager had basically been sliding by with it for a long time and they were piggybacking off of other corporate sites.

    The have never been ISO certified but got signed off as being in 'alignment' to the standards. They have some oversea customers that were pushing them for an actual certification so they posted a brand new position -- mine.

    Since I got this job I have been trying to update the documentation previously in place and get us aligned for ISO 9001:2015. I have had little to no assistance with this. I have also experienced much resistance when trying to make good improvements. It seems like they don't want change because they feel that it is extra work.

    My manager seemed very into it at first and was friendly. I had fallen sick very bad last year and it caused me to miss a couple of days. (Granted, I had time off that I HAD to use before the end of the year and sick off time) One of those days I was in the ER for my issue --back in December. I could not help it. I had 2 viruses and an infection. It seems like ever since then, my manager has hated me. His conversations are very short and he barely acknowledges me.


    He sits in his office every day, rarely to come out and talk to his people. Today he introduced a new employee around to everyone and called people over. He did not call me over nor did he mention me until an hourly employee brought up my name. Then he introduced me just as quality and compliance, he did not say manager. He introduced the purchasing manager as a manager.

    He often does not respond to my emails unless I send them two or three times.

    Also, I'm rarely given any information on quality issues that are happening. I'm not being copied on emails or put in the loop. The supplier manager continues to handle them. Now, I emailed a supplier regarding a quality issue one time and did not copy her, she then went straight to her and my manager to let him know that I did not copy her. Now she does not copy me on anything or even update me.



    I'm miserable and not sure what to do. Do I talk with him, HR, or sit here in dread every day?

    Note: This is my first official role as a QA Manager, even though I have a lot of background and experience in Quality itself.
     
  2. normzone

    normzone Well-Known Member

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    I only get to vote once, I assume. I'd say all of the above.

    Sad but true, what you describe is a not uncommon situation in a corporate culture that is only now realizing that change is in the air.

    My take on it is you're the first person through the mine field there. You're doomed ;-)

    The person who follows you, after the company blames their failings on your not being capable enough, will accomplish a little bit and then get blown up also.

    The person who follows them will make some progress, because of the sacrifices you and your successor made. Be advised that wherever a quality professional goes, it always looks like the person before them didn't do enough, and no matter how great a job you do, the person that follows you will say the same thing when they get there.

    I've been all three before - it's painful, but take the opportunity to learn as much as you can from the position and experience, and move on. Remember that as long as you're doing all that is within your power (however they limit it) you're being professional, and you'll have war stories to tell on down the road.
     
    Jennifer Kirley and Candi1024 like this.
  3. Bev D

    Bev D Moderator Staff Member

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    After 30 plus years in Quality, the situation you describe is all too familiar to me. Life is too short - find something you like to do and can feel good about...good luck!
     
    Jennifer Kirley and Candi1024 like this.
  4. Miner

    Miner Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree with both normzone and Bev.
     
  5. ncwalker

    ncwalker Well-Known Member

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    Grammy Walker always said - the best time to look for a job is when you have a job.
     
    Candi1024 likes this.
  6. hogheavenfarm

    hogheavenfarm Well-Known Member

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    Yup, a common thread here on the forums. Sounds like the GM and other managers did as little as possible to stay "compliant", but when they realized it was going to get a lot harder, they subbed out the job to a fall guy (you). Been there. They have no incentive to help you, they need a body to blame for NOT getting where they aimed for. "Anyone's fault but thiers" is the standard motto. That said, if you do begin looking for another job, you have just learned an important lesson. Always find out the history behind the position. If I was interviewing, I would ask who was the QM before (and why they left), why didn't they have one? How did they address the needed roles? I am always suspicious of a QM position available 6 months before a recertification is due, even if the existing QM is "retiring". This is another example of looking for a "fall guy". It pays to be paranoid sometimes, and when scoping out a new job, you never can have enough information.
     
  7. normzone

    normzone Well-Known Member

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    [hogheavenfarm] makes good points. The other side of that coin is, I have knowingly taken on " suicide missions " of that nature before because I

    a) needed some money, and

    b) I felt I might learn something, like a different product line, and

    c) what Grammy Walker said - accept a jive job for chump change to make it easier to find a better one

    Knowing it's a suicide mission when you walk in makes it easier to deal with - I know that sinking feeling when you thought you were going to succeed and you learn you've been set up to fail.

    Yes, knowing the story of the previous person in that role helps, but when it's a new position or " the guy was hard to get along with " doesn't provide much info. But always ask that question.

    " We have an ISO audit in three months - can you get us through that? " " Yes, but depending on what my predecessor did or didn't do, it may be ugly " :)
     
  8. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    Your story sounds familiar though my boss was more approachable (he just refused almost every suggestion I made). I left in order to find a place where my contributions would be valued. In fact, since leaving the Navy in 1995 I have yet to work in an organization in which I have been empowered and promoted.

    The writing is on the wall. I agree with the others, it is a good time to look for a better position. Manager will possibly learn (as mine did) that the subsequent person wants to get done the same things (my successor didn't get t done east long either, and lasted only long enough for a dignified entry on his resume).
     
  9. normzone

    normzone Well-Known Member

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    One of the challenges of the QA world, at least at the low level at which I play in the game, is that if you're doing a really good job of it, from a distance it appears as though you're doing little or nothing.

    And if somebody else does something wrong, or fails to do something, then it's perceived as though you're not doing your job.

    It's not a trade for the faint of heart, unfortunately. When people are talking about blood pressure and gray hair, I tell them " Quality Assurance has killed stronger men than me ".

    And as you point out, [Jennifer], it's not a ready path to promotion. To get that you usually have to blend it with Sales or Engineering.

    And severely dysfunctional outfits are the worst - I've seen departments managed by little old ladies who had any resistance beaten out of them years ago, and they just sign whatever management tells them to.

    Okay, on to cheerful Friday now :)
     
  10. Golfman25

    Golfman25 Well-Known Member

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    A couple of thoughts. First, the email cc and introduction things are petty on both sides. I hate internal email. I like sneaker net. Get out of the chair and actually have a human conversation. You're not happy and they appear to be whacked, so it is time to move on. Lots of jobs for good people.

    Now as to the approach. Why go in and start changing documentation and procedures. You say they think it is extra work. It is extra work. Your job, like it or not, is to ensure compliance while minimizing the extra work. If you can save them time and effort and make them compliant you're a hero. If you add work, forms, and procedures you'll be rejected. As previously stated your story is common. Try a different approach. Good luck.
     
  11. MP480

    MP480 Member

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    Thank you, everyone, for your input! Much appreciated! I apologize for the late response!
     

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