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Training for Presenting Data...

Discussion in 'Training - Internal, External and Web-Based' started by Nikki, Jan 21, 2016.

  1. Nikki

    Nikki Well-Known Member

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    As part of my job function - I am responsible for putting together data and presenting it to Management and my boss.

    When I do this, there are always comments like, "We would like to see this, or that..."

    As a Quality System Manager, I grew into my role... I didn't go to school for it.

    Therefore, using the tools that Excel has to offer is difficult for me.

    I have heard the terms "deltas" map, and traffic light charts - and I don't understand how to do such things.

    I am looking for training that may be available that could help me put together data in an accurate way, and also provide more insight, as that is what my group is requesting.

    The type of data I am presenting is:
    • Customer complaints
    • Internal Rejections
    • Scrap Rate per Line
    And each one is then categorized and grouped by issue, for example:
    • Color is product does not match the customer's standard
    • Contamination
    • Poor quality of the pellets
    • Poor color dispersion
    Does anyone know of any training that could help me present this data more clearly, accurately and more detailed?

    Thank you,
    Nikki
     
  2. Candi1024

    Candi1024 Well-Known Member

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    Maybe just an excel class would work for you.

    Honestly for the rest of the stuff, even excel actually, I would google away and ask here. There are so many variations on charts and names that even with a degree I still look them up first.

    Delta means change, amount or rate of change. Traffic signal refers to using red/yellow/green indicators to easily display if something is ahead or behind a goal. Maybe production rates, maybe quality level, maybe a schedule.

    Managers tend to request changes to charts even when they are done well. Different people like to see things different ways. I would maybe ask them privately for an example of what they are looking for, even if they just throw together a rough sketch.
     
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  3. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    Delta could also be used to show the gap between target and actual results.

    Just show results means little without context.

    I like stoplights or colouring cells based on if the results are achieving the target (or are within a target window).
     
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  4. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    One of the nice things in Excel is conditional formatting. Using a determined formula, cells will be automagically coloured based on the results entered.
     
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  5. Brian Vandolah

    Brian Vandolah Member

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    You could also consider putting together an Excel dashboard. However, depending on your skill sets and the data you want to present, creating one can either be an easy endeavor or a tedious task (for the uninitiated it is usually the latter).

    There is a site called Chandoo (I have no affiliation with them) which offers plenty of tutorials for creating dashboards....
     
    Emmyd likes this.
  6. Bev D

    Bev D Moderator Staff Member

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    SPC. you need SPC. Try Donald Wheeler's book "understanding variation"
    it isn't about how to create the graphs in EXCEL or whatever, it's fundamentally about how to understand and present actionable data...
     
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  7. JAltmann

    JAltmann New Member

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    It sounds like the typical situation where you simply need to tailor your presentation to the receiving audience. Make a draft and send for comments, modify based on this feedback and repeat as necessary. This is typical, although at time frustrating. In software development it is common to create a prototype for the customer to review during development.
     
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  8. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

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    Agreeing with JAltmann above...my experience with presentations of data are that those you are presenting to didn't go to school for it either, and want what they want regardless of whether there is a "normal" or "generally accepted" way.
    On the first presentation, I'll do my best at what I would like to see if it were presented to me...then based on feedback I'll alter it to what they want to see (changing form, not facts).
    A blank piece of paper during the feedback with a scribbled picture (after the meeting, not during) can do wonders for reaching mutual understanding.

    Being more of a boss now, and having lived through what you're currently going through, I tend to let the scientist/engineer present the data the first time on their own, then keep them after the meeting and pull out the scribble paper and work through with them what might be a better way to present the data. If your boss isn't doing this it's no big deal...you can do the same thing with him/her to make sure you're giving them what they want.

    Once you understand WHAT...an Excel course and/or a knowledgeable friend (like on this forum) can help with the HOW.

    • Customer complaints - month by month bar chart with multi-series bars (XL Stacked Column chart)
    • Internal Rejections - Column chart or stacked column chart by week/month/period)
    • Scrap Rate per Line - Column chart or bar chart
    And each one is then categorized and grouped by issue, for example: Grouping these is why to use a stacked column.

    ...but then the boss may prefer a radar chart, or a combo chart...which is why it pays to find out what he/she wants...people like what they like, no real reason or rhyme.
     
  9. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree. Nikki - the Original Poster - does need to understand SPC and understand what the data is saying, but she is also responsible for presenting the data in a meaningful way to her stakeholders (i.e., other managers and her boss). Not everyone is an SPC master nor do they wish to be, and yet they are in key positions that guide and direct the organization. Nikki's role is act as a translator - take the data results and present it in a way that is meaningful to her stakeholders so that information-based decisions can be made. She can then do a reverse translation...show how the results of the decisions made by her stakeholders have impacted the results (i.e., if there are spikes or dips or outliers, etc.).
     
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  10. Bev D

    Bev D Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree that not everyone is an SPC master, but you don't have to be a master to understand the charts. especially management level charts - they are easy to create meaningful limits for and get people away form "2 data points is a trend... and I believe that those of us in QA should be intellectual leaders in this critical area. we are teachers more than we are managers...
     
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