1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hello and Welcome to The Quality Forum Online...Continuing in the spirit of People Helping People !
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
You must be a registered member in order to post messages and view/download attached files in this forum.
Click here to register.

Recommended Training Program for 5S

Discussion in '5S, 5Why, 8D, TRIZ, SIPOC, RCA, Shainin Methods...' started by Tom Waite, Aug 26, 2015.

  1. Tom Waite

    Tom Waite Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2015
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    17
    Location:
    Grand Rapids Michigan Area
    Does anyone have a recommended training program they either have used or heard about for training the workforce in 5S concepts and actions?

    I have seen tons but looking for some input if any of you have a strong suggestion.

    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    573
    Trophy Points:
    92
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    If I had to pick one piece of advice it would be this...don't call it 5S...and don't expect people to memorize what each of the S's represents (in either Japanese or English). In order to make it stick, my experience has been about showing the value of a culture that has 5S integrated within it, in everything they do.

    Yes, some basic training is needed...and it will probably cover the 5S's and what they stand for...plus there is the inclusions of the tips and tools to help get that integration within your culture going...but for a guy on the floor or the lady driving the forklift, they don't care if it's called 5S or Housekeeping or That Thing We Do Every First Friday of the Month. They care about being able to do their job, quickly, efficiently, effectively and safely.

    That being said, I'm sure other people on here can recommend some great external resources. I've just developed the in-house training materials using in-house examples with the in-house tools.

    ...and if you continue reading, you'll discover my reasoning behind the first paragraph...

    Our global company had preached and advocated the 5S principles for many years. Our first attempt at implementing it failed. We picked the messiest, dirtiest, most unorganized department we had. And nothing was going to make them change...not even a nice coat of fresh paint.

    Our second attempt had us working with a department that was already organized and clean and seemingly efficient. We worked with them to find ways to improve the layout, engaged the operators, implemented their solutions (including one of their own designs for a worktable caddy system) and so on. A short hallway connected this department with our first failed attempt. Every now and then...a head would pop in and check out what we were doing and the results.

    By the time we came around to that department where we had initially failed, they were chomping at the bit to embrace the 5S culture and tools!

    Over a year or two, our employees took ownership of their areas (even to the point of handing a broom to our Brazilian owner when he tracked dirt into a traditionally dirty area...our area was so clean, you could eat off of the floor).

    Eventually, we were assessed by our Brazilian counterparts on the principles and standards and metrics that they had developed for 5S.

    ... and ...

    We failed. Why? Because our team members on the floor could not answer "What are the 5S's?" We would have aced every other part of that standard, but because we could not answer that question, we failed.

    I challenged the assessors on this. What is more important...knowing the 5S's or embracing the methodology? Do you have to consciously think about breathing in order for it to work, or is it more important that it is part of your daily routine?

    We won the challenge. We became one of the benchmark locations in the entire organization on 5S. ... And after we invited the local Toyota plant to send some people over for a tour, we had even impressed them.

    Yes, a long story. It was a long battle for us to figure out what we eventually learned. The gurus and champions may need to know all the intricate little details of 5S, but to the everyday person, the bigger challenge (with the better value), is getting them to incorporate it into their everyday activity.
     
    QUALI, Pancho, reynald and 4 others like this.
  3. Claes Gefvenberg

    Claes Gefvenberg Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    208
    Trophy Points:
    42
    Location:
    Eskilstuna, Sweden
    I have been through more or less exactly the phases Roxane describes.
    Agreed, and as usual, the route towards acceptance involves leading by example: How could I possibly ask people to get their respective work areas in order if my own desk looks like a landslide waiting to happen? Obviously, I have to (and do) keep my own room neat and tidy first.
     
    Tom Waite and RoxaneB like this.
  4. reynald

    reynald Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    2
    Location:
    Manila, Philippines
    I find Gemba Kaizen's training videos good. If I remember it correctly, the 5S module contains 6 videos: 1 overview and 1 for each steps. It contains concepts and execution how to's. They have uploaded some of their videos in youtube:
     
    Tom Waite likes this.
  5. Jim Gardner

    Jim Gardner Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    2
    Location:
    Sotland
    Tom I've attached a 5S training program which has been used several times and is quite effective. (Don't know where it came from originally).
     

    Attached File(s): 1. Scan for viruses before using. 2. Report any 'bad' files by reporting this post. 3. Use at your own Risk.:

    Tom Waite likes this.
  6. Chris Glover

    Chris Glover Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2015
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    17
    We don't have a 5S program...it failed ... so now we have a 6S program!
     
    Candi1024 likes this.
  7. Hansei

    Hansei New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    2
    We have an internal 5S training programme and its very successful.

    Each of our team members receive a total of 6 hours training and we make a point to clearly explain the english version of the 5 S's.

    Our training content is based on photo examples from everyday life that everyone can relate to, we also include a walk around our work areas so people can see how we apply it in our own workplace.
     
    Tom Waite and MCW8888 like this.
  8. MCW8888

    MCW8888 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2015
    Messages:
    640
    Likes Received:
    192
    Trophy Points:
    42
    Excellent training module.
     
    Tom Waite likes this.
  9. Tom Waite

    Tom Waite Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2015
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    17
    Location:
    Grand Rapids Michigan Area
    Going to point out the obvious but the Japanese word for Safety starts with a K. I see many people take the 6S approach with adding safety, however that has always puzzled me because safety should be first and foremost without the crutch of 5S. Everything about 5S should be with safety in mind. I am not saying it's the wrong approach - just always thought it was weird that people pull them together as to say safety is only as important as the support and approach a company takes to 5S.
     
    Hansei and RoxaneB like this.
  10. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    573
    Trophy Points:
    92
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    The 6S term works when the first 5S's are in English...Sort, Simplify all the way to Safety. That being said, I'm with you on the concept that safety should be one of the inherent characteristics of a 5S program. For example, let's look at an office environment :

    Sort - Do you need that fire extinguisher? Well, it's not part of your job but regulations and an overall sense of self-preservations says that you do need it 'just in case'.
    Simplify - Hopefully, you don't need to use that fire extinguisher every day, so perhaps it doesn't need to be immediately within reach.
    Shine (or Systematic clean) - Regular inspections of the fire extinguisher to ensure it is usable.
    Standardize - Has the same approach been taken to identify and maintain fire extinguishers (eg, not blocked).
    Sustain - Is there evidence of regular inspection/maintenance, training on use? Has the extinguisher actually been used and appropriately replenished?

    If, however, you think my fire extinguisher example is too obvious an example...having come from a background heavy in manufacturing, our Shine (or Systematic clean) section of the checklist included items about no puddles or hoses or tripping harzards in the area. Again...safety should be a built-in notion within a 5S culture. I find including it as a separate notion creates silos within a culture - it's comparable to ISO 9001's QUALITY Management System. Those who truly don't understand the concept believe that it's the Quality Department's job and fail to recognize that Quality is part of everyone's job in everything that they do...no matter if it's the person who signs the pay cheques, touches the product or sweeps the floor.
     
    Mukesh Sharma and Tom Waite like this.
  11. Chris Glover

    Chris Glover Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2015
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    17
    Exactly..Safety is a natural output of a successful 5S program. Implementing 6S is a sign 5S failed.
    Another aspect of our program that drives me nuts is the rules...not consistent throughout the plant..and offices. What is acceptable is some areas in prohibited in others..especially in the office areas. the people that made the rules have had ZERO training on 5S or 6S..hence the inconsistency.

    But, having said all that, the plant and offices are in better shape. But it has to do more with management pushing the issue than 6S over 5S. No one, especially management, took the 5S program seriously.
     
    Tom Waite, Hansei and RoxaneB like this.
  12. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    573
    Trophy Points:
    92
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    When 5S is not consistently applied, it's a program not a culture.

    Actually, I have another reason for disliking 6S...when were first discussed possibly going that route of adding 'Safety', people confused it with our 6 Sigma initiative.
     
    Tom Waite likes this.
  13. Chris Glover

    Chris Glover Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2015
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    17
    What has also happened is the creation of the unofficial 6S police...certain people who have made it their goal in life to constantly walk around and take photos of areas that are out of order..and make sure they send those photos to the boss...it is not about 6S, it is about "ratting" people out
     
    reynald likes this.
  14. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    573
    Trophy Points:
    92
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Any system...if it is to succeed...should have minimal enforcement. Checks are one thing...reviewing results, even audits to a certain point. But the "Kwality Kops" and a 5/6S equivalent add little, if any, value to the overall system. I've always said that the true sign that I've helped to implement a system is when I am no longer needed.
     
    normzone likes this.
  15. Michael

    Michael New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    2
    Location:
    China
    I totally agree, for example, if there is knife in a cabinet, when someone is looking for something in the cabinet. The knife may accidentally hurt him/her. It is an safety issue, but the root cause of the safety issue is the poor 5S. The knife should not be stored in the cabinet.
     
  16. MJBFL

    MJBFL New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    We are also implementing 5S, but hardest parts seem to be making system for audits. So far we are working towards making a smooth system. Please suggest inputs.
     
  17. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    573
    Trophy Points:
    92
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    How does your organization currently assess if workplaces are sorted, simplified and systematically cleaned? That could be the foundation of your checks.

    My organization, however, did implement audits conducted by personnel external to the department. These audits were not announced and could take place at any time. This was done to assess if work places were being maintained outside of a designated audit period window. That being said, we did not conduct 5S audits on downdays (i.e., maintenance days when the activities in the area were not the normal day-to-day routines).
     
  18. reynald

    reynald Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    2
    Location:
    Manila, Philippines
    I'm going to top this one. I talked to a consultant and he said another S should be added to ensure 6S's success: 5S + Safety + Sensitivity = 7S. :)
     
    Chris Glover likes this.
  19. Vijay Deshpande

    Vijay Deshpande New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Kaizen means "improvement" - "Kai" means change/make better, and "Zen" means good. Kaizen is the Japanese philosophy of continuous improvement by all the employees in an organization so that they perform their tasks a little better each day.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2017

Share This Page