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Quality by Design

Discussion in 'Human Factors and Ergonomics' started by Ravi Khare, Aug 6, 2015.

  1. Ravi Khare

    Ravi Khare Member

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    I read this interesting passage by Don Norman from his ‘Design of Everyday Things’.

    It’s not about stresses, strains, linkages and mechanisms really then. The science and the art of Design is more about people. Comments and views from experts?
     
  2. Jan van der Kuil

    Jan van der Kuil New Member

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    It is a bit of both. Design is about making things suitable for the intended user, considering the skills of the user group. E.g. if you design a medical device you assume other skills if the device will be used by the physician/surgeon/nurse or by a patient/layperson.
     
  3. PaulJSmith

    PaulJSmith Well-Known Member

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    In your example, Ravi, unless the file cabinet was designed to open with the twist-push-bang method, then it's simply a damaged or faulty device. This may or may not reflect on the design itself.
     
    Jennifer Kirley likes this.
  4. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

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    Sigh, I get to be the annoying Capitalist again...

    Design is about making things to fill the intended purpose...which takes into account the user and the application...

    Maybe the design was near-perfect. The $45 cabinet worked faultlessly for the intended two-year life-span, and an additional 5yrs beyond that...and now is in need of replacement since you've already gotten your $45 value out of it.
    The fault in the design is that it lasted 5yrs too long.

    Design must fit the big picture...not just the initial user and the initial usage.
    There is not enough info in the OP excerpt to see the big picture...so I simply proposed another possible rationale...I'm not really that cold:)...
     
  5. Candi1024

    Candi1024 Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it was designed that way so it would be secure, and so the owner could look cool like Fonzi.
    Now that is ART in Design. ;)
     
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  6. Ravi Khare

    Ravi Khare Member

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    I do realize as I read your posts that the Filing cabinet from the book might have a damaged mechanism. It indeed would not perform as designed.
    As Eric points out it might have outlived its useful life. You big bad capitalist, you are making me give up my vintage possessions in favor of commerce ;).

    Jan and Eric you nail it right in the head for me as you say the design needs to be suitable to the intended user.

    Don Norman writes as well to the effect that a Design has two components. The features of the product, and the features of the one who is going use it (and by now you must've guessed I am in love with the 'Design of Everyday Things' book). I too believe it's always the interaction of the two that differentiates a good perceived quality from the other. Design, apart from being a technical skill is a lot of psychology too..
     
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