Dismiss Notice
You must be a registered member in order to post messages and view/download attached files in this forum.
Click here to register.

Process analysis of a manufacturing company

Discussion in 'Manufacturing and Related Processes' started by essegn, Oct 5, 2019.

  1. essegn

    essegn Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2016
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    7
    I would be interested in how to analyze a company's business process - something similar, how it is being made from business consultants .

    Are there any books on the topic? I am the only interested in "an ANALYSE-Phase".
    What should i look for?

    I mean an approach, that could be used for all manufacturing companies to improve processing times, breakage rate, operating costs, reducing customer complaints etc.. Something like a standardized approach, without being focused on some goal.

    Some related subjects:
    - Value Stream Analysis
    - Process audit
    - IT - Planning and control tasks
    - Capacity planning of employees and plants
     
    Maria Foaster likes this.
  2. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    158
    Trophy Points:
    42
    Location:
    Northeast USA
    "Something like a standardized approach, without being focused on some goal."

    Not being aware of such a book, I wonder what the point of one would be?
    All of the subjects you list have a goal...removing the goal seems a bit counterproductive...what am I missing?

    "To me, there is only one form of depravity - The man without a purpose." - Atlas Shrugged -
     
  3. essegn

    essegn Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2016
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    7
    I meant any business process improvement (technique) to analyse:
    • Processing times
    • breakage rate
    • Operating costs
    • reducing customer complaints
    • Need of product developement
    • Employer satisfaction
    Without knowledge (before the analysis) what is going wrong in a company.
    This should be an output from the analysis i asked for.

    For instance: you as a business consultant got an offer from XY company. Your goal is to lead an improvement project, but you have some circumstantial evidence, that almost everything is not working as it should be.
    What is necessary to do, in order to find out, what everything in the company does not work ideal.

    Are there any books on the topic? I am the only interested in "an ANALYSE-Phase".
    What should i look for?

    Some related subjects:
    - Value Stream Analysis
    - Process audit
    - IT - Planning and control tasks
    - Capacity planning of employees and plants
     
  4. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2015
    Messages:
    3,037
    Likes Received:
    1,550
    Trophy Points:
    112
    Location:
    In the "Rust Belt"
    As a consultant, let me help you. Hire someone who knows how to do this and work with them. If you have to ask us, then you are not experienced to do this work and you will fail. What do you, and more importantly your client, risk from such an engagement? If you wish to act with professional diligence and integrity, find someone and understudy them.
     
  5. essegn

    essegn Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2016
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    7
    Thank you for your reply. You wanted to help, but you didn't.
    I have not written that i work as consultant.

    Are there any books on this topic?
    I mean something like practical guide of Audits + TPS or LEAN + TOC + Industry 4.0.
    Maybe some case studies?
    what terms should I look for?
     
  6. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2015
    Messages:
    792
    Likes Received:
    901
    Trophy Points:
    92
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Without a defined scope, you will have no focus to your analysis. To say "that almost everything is not working as it should" is too generic to be helpful for anyone attempting to identify areas of opportunity within an organization.

    It all bubbles up to top management and their direction...what are the objectives of the organization? From there, determining what processes, measures, and resources are in place to help support the achievement of those objectives. This includes accountability. If top management hasn't set expectations or goals, then no one knows what to do or what direction to go in or what is expected of them.

    I suppose you could, as a starting point, take ISO 9001 and look for gaps within their management system.

    • Does top management have objectives
    • Are there plans and processes and measures in place to support those objectives
    • How are people aware of their role in the achievement of the objectives
    • How are processes controlled to supposed the achievement of the objectives
    • ..and so on...
    For a more in-depth analysis, you need data...lots and lots of data. If they don't have data, it may be difficult to pinpoint trends or patterns within their processes. Data takes the anecdotal and circumstantial evidences out of the equation. It may validate some "gut feelings" that people had...or it may shock them to discover that their perception was off. But data gives you that starting point to asking why things are happening they way they are.

    Don't misunderstand me, people are a key component to this analysis, but data can often give you a really good starting point for a more focused conversation. It may also take away some of your own personal biases...or those within the organization.

    I can't help you with the book question. While I've read many books on topics such as process analysis, operational improvement, process controls, routine and improvement management, strategic planning, employee engagement, etc., the most valuable teacher has been experience (which I think is what Andy was trying to say). I've made mistakes the way and errors in judgement, so, please accept this two pieces of advice that I don't think I've ever read in a book

    1. Ask questions and never, ever presume that you know what the solution is...especially if you do not understand the problem.
    2. Your most valuable source of information (i.e., the problems and the solutions) - beyond the data - will be the people who actually do the job.
     
  7. essegn

    essegn Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2016
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    7
    Dear Roxane,

    thank you very much for your reply.
    I believe that the most effective way how to achieve any goal, is the combination of education (continuing education) and the experience.
    Without fundamental principles is no mastery possible.

    It looks like I'm in trouble to express, what i really need.

    I try to explain as following on Performance / Process improvement methodologies:
    to reduce variation -> Six Sigma methodology - it clear, step by step what is to do (project chart, tools, statistics)
    -> Statistical Engineering (Shainin)
    takt times / cycles times, performance targets - Breakage, Yields, WIP -> Gemba Kaizen
    to increase throughput -> Theory of constraints

    ----------------
    Mindset or philosophy -> Lean is all really extensively documented.
    Process improvement / coaching -> Toyota Kata

    Mother of all excellence strategies -> TQM


    ----------------


    Tools or methology for an analysis of the current state -> ??
    What everything needs to be considered?
    Is there any methodology or book or education that covers such topics?


    ----------------


    With this I wanted to express that there is a suitable methodology for certain topics, listed above.
    My goal is to find some book or the expression that includes topics above- something like theory of everything in physics, but for operations.


    For me it looks like, that the either Process Excellence or Operational Excellence should be, what i asked for.
    I have checked few books and article, but it was not what i had expected.
    BPM - I am not sure.

    The best main tools for analysis , I know and use so far, are Process maps & Value Stream Mapping & KPIs & internal audits (checklists).

    What else is there to consider?
     

Share This Page