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Management Review that doesn't suck!

Discussion in 'ISO 9001:2015 - Quality Management Systems' started by Arby911, Jan 30, 2019.

  1. Arby911

    Arby911 New Member

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    Ok, I've spent a lot of time in the learning and development world facilitating more classes than I care to admit, but there's one thing in the ISO world that I've not yet managed to accomplish.

    A management review that's useful, interesting, efficient and is centered around the needs of the company, not the needs of the certification.

    You know, one that doesn't suck...

    One where the participants at the end are excited (or at least willing...) to "go forth and do", rather than wondering where lunch is.

    I am wholly and completely open to suggestions, as I've a very limited capacity to engage in meetings for the sake of meeting.
     
  2. KyleG

    KyleG Active Member

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    Following, I to am looking to put together a meaningful efficient management review, i have low tolerance for meeting to set up another meeting. lol =D
     
  3. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Firstly, good to have that goal in mind. Secondly, a meeting may not the the way to go. Thirdly, if done correctly, beware that some people are going to look bad when they come to the review (if it's a meeting)...

    The management review I organize - the general manager said it was the best meeting they'd ever been to - required each process owner to come to the review to talk about their process, the goals/objectives for that, the recent measurement results and what was being worked on to correct and/or improve it. There were 4 core processes and 3 of the owners loved coming to the review, proud of what their teams were accomplishing, identifying problems and working to correct things. One P.O had a 60% rework loop, done on 3rd shift, and they conducted a magical brain storming session, corrective action etc which removed the error literally overnight.

    The one process owner never got it. She came late to the meeting, always blaming someone else for her numbers. She was offered help. Soon she found the heat was too much and it became apparent she didn't want the job...she quit. The organization had better than world-class ppm...
     
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  4. KyleG

    KyleG Active Member

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    i like the Idea of having process owners and they be responsible for their own cog in the machine. Thanks Andy.
     
  5. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    While I embrace the idea of people taking ownership of their own processes, I think the first question to ask is why do management review? Why does it exist? From there you, can develop the how to do it and what to do for it. But if everyone agrees to the why and understands the why, management review might become a bit more valuable.
     
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  6. Arby911

    Arby911 New Member

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    I can see empowering process owners, that's potentially valuable information, and thanks!

    As to defining "why", I'm less convinced that will lead to the desired outcome. As an example, I already know, being a man of a certain age, why I have to do certain medical screenings. That has no value whatsoever in making the process more palatable...

    I further suspect a random sampling of employees involved in management reviews at 100 random certified companies as to "why" would overwhelmingly (90%+, and I'm being conservative) reveal the primary response to be "because ISO XXX says we have to"...

    I've been looking into how to determine what the PARTICIPANTS need from a management review, rather than what a specification or corporate goal/guideline/wish list needs. I've not yet been able to fully see the path for that, but I sense it's at least the right direction.
     
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  7. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    Then, to be quite blunt, your organization has failed to understand and/or articulate the value behind management review. Have a look at Simon Sinek's TedTalk and the Golden Circle, and perhaps rethink the Why behind management review.

    It sounds as if your organization has taken this approach:

    WHAT - We do management review.
    HOW - Through meetings to discuss results.
    WHY - Because ISO says we have do.

    Positively riveting, isn't it? o_O No wonder employees - both those who are involved in management review and those who are not - find the requirements of the standard so onerous.

    Try the other way and really think about why your organization does management review, why your organization is even certified...push yourself to think beyond the "easy answers." Here's my first attempt at it, and while you may find it a tad touchy-feely, does it not make you stop and think that maybe, just maybe, there's some value behind this thing called management review?

    WHY - We believe in being the best we can possibly be...and even better than that.
    HOW - We do this by checking our performance and setting ambitious targets.
    WHAT - We just happen do this through management review.
     

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  8. tony s

    tony s Well-Known Member

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    Before our organization seek ISO 9001 certification, we already had our monthly management committee (ManCom) meeting. Some of the agenda/topic are regularly discussed such as operations' performance targets, and there are topics that are tackled when we deem important to address issues needing action (e.g. customer complaints, results of audits). We do this ManCom meeting because our management need to know our performance in achieving our goals and those things that we need to resolve. As Arby911 put it "centered around the needs of the company". We don't do this because ISO says so.

    When we were audited for ISO 9001 certification, we just presented our monthly ManCom minutes to demonstrate conformity with clause 9.3. We don't make the "inputs" (as specified by Clause 9.3.2) as agenda/topics in our ManCom meeting. They are just treated as intended by the standard i.e. plain "inputs". For example if we discussed a topic about our company's Customer Satisfaction Target, we can easily demonstrate that we have easily covered 9.3.2c.1, 9.3.2c.2, and 9.3.2c.5. When we discussed about the proper actions to address a customer negative audit finding, we demonstrated that we covered 9.3.2c.4 and 9.3.2c.6. For our organization, the "inputs" are interrelated and doesn't need to be discussed as individual agenda/topics.
     
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  9. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    I had a management team use SWOTs to organize their process inputs for management review. They were very enthusiastic about it, which was a wonderful feeling for me too.

    I agree it is critical for the process owners to come to the review to talk about their process, the goals/objectives for that, the recent measurement results and what was being worked on to correct and/or improve it. That is the essence of this whole thing. I can easily imagine all of the required inputs being included without the need for these "Death by Powerpoint" chores.

    I have a client that breaks up their management review throughout the year, focusing monthly on specific subjects. This is perfectly okay, if it is effective and managers are comfortable with it.

    It is also true that there is no requirement to hold a face-to-face meeting. These days, managers are often out of the office anyway. It is possible to perform management reviews remotely, so long as everything gets covered and participation is ensured.
     
  10. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    This is so true. A good auditor should be able to recognize inputs when we see them, and not rely on templated agendas.
     
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  11. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    :eek: Shock! Horror! What ARE you suggesting?;)
     
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  12. Neo113016

    Neo113016 Member

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    Hi Arby!

    Visualize the whole organization as a patient and doing a regular consultation to a doctor (Top Management).

    Based on the data presented, the doctor (Top Management) will need to take a look at your medical history to diagnose the cause of any symptoms of illness. Then, will prescribe the right medication for the treatment if there is any sickness.
     
  13. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    This is not a good analogy, since the QMS is supposed to keep the person healthy (to continue the analogy, even though it doesn't fit). Management Review isn't about going to a doctor or even close. If the body is a system, like a QMS, each process would have to have someone who "owned" it. The Process Owners should know how their processes is working, not go to someone else (who is better qualified) who tests/examines it...
     

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