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Management of change.

Discussion in 'ISO 9001:2015 - Quality Management Systems' started by Charles Glatfelter, Aug 9, 2016.

  1. Charles Glatfelter

    Charles Glatfelter New Member

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    We are looking to implement a management of change within my company, does anyone have ideas on where to begin?
     
  2. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    I never was a big fan of the term "change management"...I prefer "change engagement".

    Why does your company wish to do this, Charles? Understanding the real reason behind that may spark some ideas on how to enable and sustain change within your organization.

    Kotter has published a lot on this subject and, in true change agent fashion, he has even updated his approach from what he originally outlined many years ago.

    IHI (Institute for Healthcare Improvement) and NHS (National Health Services) have change agent training and/or material and/or certification options, but they obviously have a healthcare focus (not sure what industry you are in).

    One thing to consider is the integration of change enablement within your project management process (or action planning process if you do not have a formal project management framework established). Many times I see the two aligned and working side-by-side, but they are kept separate. If you think about it, a project or action plan is about implementing a change and one of the keys to achieving and sustaining results is engagement of stakeholders. It seems like common sense (at least to me) to integrate the two.
     
  3. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    It would help to understand WHAT is going to be changed. Culture is a different kettle of fish compared to a process, when considering change, for example.
     
  4. tony s

    tony s Well-Known Member

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    I'm thinking of using a form like this.
     

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  5. Bev D

    Bev D Moderator Staff Member

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    So you are thinking about product and procedural changes as opposed to major 'cultural' or program changes...
    The form seems fine as a record of resulting necessary actions and considerations. You might consider something about material cut in where material revisions are involved.

    To assess if this sufficient it would be helpful to understand what prompted you to consider this 'change'. What gap, weakness or problem with your current system are you trying to correct or improve?
     
  6. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    Change management almost always happens to some extent, but the question is "Are we including all the needed factors?"

    The answer to that question relies on the nature of the change. Manufacturing plants with Process Safety Management systems due to significant quantities of highly hazardous chemicals are required to have Management of Change (MOC) that can be quite detailed. Systems with lesser needs can adopt the same principals, but perhaps to a lesser degree of detail.

    Changing how we do things is a different matter. I suggest Kotter's 8-step method. I am not affiliated with Kotter or MindTools, though I have to admit I wish I was...
     
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  7. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    What I find fascinating...and encouraging...is that Kotter has "changed" his 8-steps. It's not that they're no longer applicable, but they've been revised to recognize the shift/agility within business cultures/environments in the ~20 years since the 8-steps were introduced.
     
  8. becka

    becka New Member

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    For Google to maintain a culture of innovation as well as maintaining employee satisfaction, there are a few things that are focused. They focus on an “innovation-oriented culture, so much as that they have appointed a Chief Cultural Officer (CCO) whose sole job is to maintain the culture over time” (Steiber, 2013). Google shaped its culture on its vision and mission statements which is why their culture is still so strong and aligns with innovation and employee satisfaction. When they select the right individuals, they are competent but also fit within the culture of Google Inc. This is an important step that I believe many hospitals should investigate because they often overlook the culture. They may need to start by going back to their mission and vision statements and laying out core values upon which they can construct their culture. Maybe appointing a CCO can help in creating and laying out the core values and also ensuring that moving forward the culture of the company will get consideration. This will aid in creating an environment that is clear and transparent and is essential for having a positive work atmosphere as well as having an innovative one as well. Part of their culture also sets up something called TGIF sessions. The higher up managers, “engage is weekly TGIF sessions where they field questions from their employees” (Manjoo, 2011). This also creates a workplace culture that has clear and open communication. Using Google’s examples, there can be a CCO that is hired to ensure that the culture of the organization is maintained and accounted for in every decision that is made. One innovative patient management technique that is being studied is Kanban. This is a management tool that is being looked at to streamline patient care into discharges from the hospital and reduce their readmission rates. This, “tool uses real-time data about a patient and combines it will using interdisciplinary team meetings at various times of day to make sure that the patient is getting the proper tests in a shorter amount of time while getting rid of redundant orders” (Carlos de Oliveria, 2020). The healthcare professionals that have been using this bed management tool feel like it is a good tool however, some of the healthcare providers such as the physicians do not value including different teams such as the social worker or the nursing staff. This is something that can be addressed in the culture of the company. It should be made known that the primary focus of the whole team no matter what their position is at the hospital is for the efficient care and treatment of the patients to reduce the time of their stay as well as reduce the rate of readmission. This is a newer management tool that can be used but it will take innovation to make it work efficiently.


    References
    Carlos de Oliveria, L. C. (2020). Nurses in the kaban: Are there news meanings of professional practice in innovative tools for hospital care management. Ciencia & Saude Coletiva, 25(1), 283-292. doi:10.1590/1413-81232020251.28362019

    Manjoo, F. (2011). How new ceo larry page will lead the company he cofounded into the future. Fast Company(154). Retrieved 2 14, 2020, from http://eds.b.ebscohost.com/eds/deta...c2I0ZHMtbGI2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRI#AN=59626099&db=b

    Steiber, A. &. (2013). A corporate system for continuous innovation: The case of google inc. European Journal of Innovation Management, 16(2), 243-264. doi:10.1108/1460106131124566
     

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