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Management of change.

Discussion in 'ISO 9001:2015 - Quality Management Systems' started by Charles Glatfelter, Aug 9, 2016.

  1. Charles Glatfelter

    Charles Glatfelter New Member

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    We are looking to implement a management of change within my company, does anyone have ideas on where to begin?
     
  2. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    I never was a big fan of the term "change management"...I prefer "change engagement".

    Why does your company wish to do this, Charles? Understanding the real reason behind that may spark some ideas on how to enable and sustain change within your organization.

    Kotter has published a lot on this subject and, in true change agent fashion, he has even updated his approach from what he originally outlined many years ago.

    IHI (Institute for Healthcare Improvement) and NHS (National Health Services) have change agent training and/or material and/or certification options, but they obviously have a healthcare focus (not sure what industry you are in).

    One thing to consider is the integration of change enablement within your project management process (or action planning process if you do not have a formal project management framework established). Many times I see the two aligned and working side-by-side, but they are kept separate. If you think about it, a project or action plan is about implementing a change and one of the keys to achieving and sustaining results is engagement of stakeholders. It seems like common sense (at least to me) to integrate the two.
     
  3. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    It would help to understand WHAT is going to be changed. Culture is a different kettle of fish compared to a process, when considering change, for example.
     
  4. tony s

    tony s Well-Known Member

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    I'm thinking of using a form like this.
     

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  5. Bev D

    Bev D Moderator Staff Member

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    So you are thinking about product and procedural changes as opposed to major 'cultural' or program changes...
    The form seems fine as a record of resulting necessary actions and considerations. You might consider something about material cut in where material revisions are involved.

    To assess if this sufficient it would be helpful to understand what prompted you to consider this 'change'. What gap, weakness or problem with your current system are you trying to correct or improve?
     
  6. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    Change management almost always happens to some extent, but the question is "Are we including all the needed factors?"

    The answer to that question relies on the nature of the change. Manufacturing plants with Process Safety Management systems due to significant quantities of highly hazardous chemicals are required to have Management of Change (MOC) that can be quite detailed. Systems with lesser needs can adopt the same principals, but perhaps to a lesser degree of detail.

    Changing how we do things is a different matter. I suggest Kotter's 8-step method. I am not affiliated with Kotter or MindTools, though I have to admit I wish I was...
     
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  7. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    What I find fascinating...and encouraging...is that Kotter has "changed" his 8-steps. It's not that they're no longer applicable, but they've been revised to recognize the shift/agility within business cultures/environments in the ~20 years since the 8-steps were introduced.
     

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