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Ferrite core Failure mode

Discussion in 'FMEA - Failure Modes and Effects Analysis' started by alan jackson, Apr 7, 2020.

  1. alan jackson

    alan jackson New Member

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    I am completing an FMEA on a product with a ferrite core fitted in the wiring loom. Should I include this in my FMEA and if so what are the failure modes and mode probability?
     
  2. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Alan: Welcome!

    I'd like to offer this reply, and fear you may not like it. We can't help with that! We can tell you who can. It's the TEAM who should be working on this FMEA (you didn't say if it is a design or process FMEA you're working on).

    When you say "I" am completing an FMEA, alarm bells should be sounding. This is a team sport. Also, the probability should come from your own organization's experience with failures.

    Can I ask you if you've had training on FMEA?
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2020
    yodon and John C. Abnet like this.
  3. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

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    Is the Ferrite core any more critical than the wire windings? The Capacitors? The resistors? The insulators?
    You've told us nothing about the product, so beyond Andy's correct response...we can't even give opinions as if we were on said TEAM.
     
  4. alan jackson

    alan jackson New Member

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    The Ferrite is in place because of an EMC susepability issue. We found that at 100V/M the joystick fell down in frequency range of 200MHz to 240MHz, then was fine up to around the 2G mark.
    The ferrite solved this problem .
    I haven't had an formal FMEA training but over the years I have completed a fair few
     
  5. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd suggest you start there. It's not a case of "completing them" It's about effective process control. Is the FMEA a requirement from a customer?
     
  6. Miner

    Miner Moderator Staff Member

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    Is this a DFMEA or a PFMEA?
     
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  7. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Sounds like a design issue to me!
     
  8. Miner

    Miner Moderator Staff Member

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    This did, but the original post mentioned fitting the core in a wiring loom, which sounds like process equipment. That is why I asked.
     
  9. Eric Twiname

    Eric Twiname Well-Known Member

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    Assuming DFMEA: If I were on the team (don't miss that part, get the team together)...

    The ferrite core serves a specific role in the equipment. Include it, together with the effects/results/risk of "the joystick fell down in frequency range of 200MHz to 240MHz" should the core be (left out/crack/shift/other).
     

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