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Difference between SQC and SPC

Discussion in 'SPC - Statistical Process Control' started by Kamal, Nov 17, 2015.

  1. Kamal

    Kamal New Member

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    Dear all,
    i am new to forum.thanks for creating quality forum after cove forum.
    i want to know difference between SPC and SQC.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Jim Gardner

    Jim Gardner Member

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    To quote Dr.Ishikawa:
    SQC is the application of 14 statistical and analytical tools ( 7 Quality Control + 7 Supplemental) to monitor Process Outputs (Dependent Variables).

    SPC is the application of the same 14 tools to control Process Inputs ( Independent Variables).

    If you go to ASQ.org/learn about you will find examples of all 14 tools and samples of their use.
     
  3. Bev D

    Bev D Moderator Staff Member

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    An alternative definition is that SPC is about creating stable processes using Control Charts and SQC is more focused on acceptance testing (inspection) and Guage R&R. (Western Electric Statistical Quality Control Handbook) These two terms have had various definitions over the years.
     
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  4. reynald

    reynald Member

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    "These two terms have had various definitions over the years." - I learned from the old Cove not to focus on acronyms but rather on the tools and intent. But these varying definitions is really a pain in the @#s. Talked to some self-proclaimed Lean expert lately and I can't follow a single sentence he is saying. Turned out our definitions are not the same (i.e. i think of VSM as a tool and the actual drawing, he thinks of it as a 2-day exercise/workshop involving line balancing, etc).

    Anyways just venting out
     
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