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9.1.2 Customer satisfaction Questionnaires

Discussion in 'ISO 9001:2015 - Quality Management Systems' started by Micheal Lenka, Apr 9, 2019.

  1. Micheal Lenka

    Micheal Lenka Member

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    Who is the ideal person to send out Customer Satisfaction Questionnaires to customers? is it Internal Sales, Sales Reps or Quality Assurance who is not directly involved in sales. My question is more about who is this ideal person whose involvement wont affect inputs of customers in this questionnaires thereby enabling the Organization to obtain true customer perception output.
     
  2. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Unless you are committed to questionnaires, I wouldn't recommend them. Most customers don't like them. They don't present the information you're seeking. A simple phone call and 4 or 5 questions works much better, in my experience. Also, you will likely have 2 or 3 "customers" at each company you supply, so ensure you speak to all of them: Buyer, Material controller and user/quality.
     
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  3. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    The approach of sending out surveys isn’t my preferred approach - the work/cost to send out all those surveys doesn’t always translate into valuable return of data. However, if this is the approach taken by your company, sending them out might gain more of a response if done by the person/department that usually interacts with the client. But I’d suggest that the results be sent to an independent group, such as Q.A. For analysis and presentation.

    Surveys can be emotional. People are more likely to voice their complaint than to voice a compliment.

    And if the organization doesn’t action the results of the survey (I.e., improve), this may result in customers wondering if the organization cares about them.
     
  4. Ellie

    Ellie New Member

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    I'm not a fan of surveys but we use them. My thought is that we are in touch with customers all day long. We even pay people to call them and visit them. The folks having the conversations can easily ask, "So, how are we doing? Deliveries OK?" Isn't that the function of call reports, to gather feedback and devise ways to increase sales by raising customer satisfaction?

    It's hard to break away from what we've used in the past, but I don't feel the surveys give us actionable info. Or value.

    Interested to hear what others think.
     
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  5. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Right! In fact, the standard doesn't require customer satisfaction measurement but an evaluation of the perception of whether requirements have been met (or something similar). Customer sat isn't really a measurement, despite being in the section 9 requirements. What we're interested in the a) the perception and b) an outcome of DOING THINGS RIGHT. It's really a symptom we're interested in as a means to ensure we're aligned to the customer. For example, how many of us have left a restaurant, been asked if everything was OK, answered yes, when we actually mean yes, but... And why don't we let them know? Because our perception is that we don't think they could do better! Or they wouldn't have done that if they understood how to do it right. Or a variation of these.

    It is good, however well we're in touch with a customer, to periodically draw a "line in the dirt" and check, however.
     
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