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What is Process Mapping ?

Discussion in 'ISO 9001:2015 - Quality Management Systems' started by RABINDRA KUMAR RAY, Jun 23, 2017.

  1. RABINDRA KUMAR RAY

    RABINDRA KUMAR RAY New Member

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    Dear All,

    Please let me know that what is process mapping, which process is applicable for process mapping, input & outputs of all applicable process, efficiency & Effectiveness of process.

    please share knowledge about it. please share sample if possible.
     
  2. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Process mapping is diagramming any process, from inputs, to outputs. Very often it is a way to capture the "current state" as it is practiced. Process mapping should be done by people who participate in the process to ensure accuracy. No-one (here) can accurately define your organization's process.
     
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  3. tony s

    tony s Well-Known Member

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    Similar to the concept of Google Map, process maps can have different levels. At the highest level (i.e. where we can see all the processes within a QMS), we usually call it a "system-level process map" (it's like viewing the entire map of a country). At the mid-level (i.e. where we can see the inputs, outputs and other parts of a particular process), we usually call it a "turtle diagram" or "SIPOC diagram" (it's like viewing a particular state or region within a country). And the lowest level (i.e. where we can see the activities within a procedure), we usually call it "flow charts" (it's like viewing the main roads, blocks and lots within a city).

    Attach is a sample presentation of the different levels of process maps. On this example, we can see interaction of the "Finish Goods Inspection Process" with the other QMS processes, including the key activities within the FG Inspection Process.
     

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  4. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    I would struggle to "map" efficiency and effectiveness.

    Process maps are used to illustrate sequence and interaction of processes. I want to point out that none of the standards I work with require, now or in previous version, a process map; those two words do not appear next to each other in the text. The requirement is to identify sequence and interaction. I have seen this accomplished with tables of text, annotated turtle diagrams (which do have a field in which to identify effectiveness/efficiency types of measure), and a set of flow charts that annotate associated and/or "internal customer(s)" of that process.
     
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  5. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    If you avoid using Turtles and SIPOC diagrams and simply diagram the current state of the process (much as a spaghetti diagram is used in Lean methodologies) it becomes pretty obvious where the ineffectiveness and inefficiencies lie. The diagram shows you! Using diagrams like Turtles simply provides a "bucket" to account for things which work on/with the process. I've yet to see them work (at all) and they were originally more complex (I think Phil Crosby first developed them) and were, more recently, a way to force element auditors to think "process". SIPOC is OK, but you must capture the actual step by step of the process...
     
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  6. normzone

    normzone Well-Known Member

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    Thank you, [Andy]. It's nice to have an explanation for why tools such as that seem so clumsy in application.
     
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  7. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    While we're on the subject, another misused tool is the technique of the flow chart - which diagrams the "logic" of a process. Based on early computer programming techniques, companies have used such diagramming to depict the "flow" of a process. That "flow" comes from and understanding of the "logic" behind the process, not the actual practiced activities. It's common to learn the flow charting method by diagramming how to change a flat tire/tyre on a car, for example. All very well, but it's the logic behind the task being used, not the actual process - which could have you walking backwards and forwards to opposite ends of the vehicle to retrieve various tools etc. And rarely does it deal with reality. I recall, many years ago, having to respond to a request from a major manufacturer for a corrective action for their spare parts process. We were required to map the process. We papered the conference room wall and diagrammed, step by step, responsibility by responsibility, task by task, the entire process. Boy, was it ugly. No wonder then, that we couldn't get the right spare part in the box, labelled correctly etc. Worse, we gave the primary responsibility (and access to a key computer log in) to one of the least dependable people! D'oh!

    More recently, after mapping the "as is state" of a process, one person took a look at the ugliness and made a bold statement: "No wonder we can't get things out on time with all these reviews..." - very accurately summed up!
     
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  8. Che Promubol

    Che Promubol Member

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    Im not a fan of Turtles and SAIPOC, IMO the Input/ActivityOutput is key to get right first, then add the other parts. The way your processes interface and capturing this accuratley is what an auditor will be looking for.
     
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  9. RoxaneB

    RoxaneB Moderator Staff Member

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    I map out proccesses as a sequence of actvitities within swimlanes - this shows who does what and when (within the process). I also identify the metrics/indicators/control items associated with the process and attempt to show where they and the process steps touch. The reasoning behind this is that if targets are not achieved, we may have an idea of where to start analyzing within the process.
     
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  10. careyLYNN

    careyLYNN New Member

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    Good morning,
    Are you making a process map for your core Processes? How does that look.
    Also with the new process approach for internal auditing, how are schedules being created?
    Any opinions?
     
  11. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    Is the "process approach" for internal audits a requirement for ISO 9001:2015? I have heard it is for the automotive industry. I can't see that audits have to be done the same way, from 9.2.2. I can see the QMS is supposed to be based on processes, but not audits. Can you clarify?
     
  12. tony s

    tony s Well-Known Member

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    If I have a system-level map that shows the sequence and interaction of the QMS processes (as shown below), my audit program will indicate the schedule on when each QMS process will be audited (see example below). You create a schedule of audit of the processes and not of the departments.
    upload_2017-8-18_11-26-38.png upload_2017-8-18_11-26-43.png
     
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