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We don't include repair process in CP, why?

Discussion in 'APQP and PPAP' started by judegu, Jul 11, 2018.

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  1. judegu

    judegu Member

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    I have read the part which talks about control plan in APQP manual. It doesn't mention this kind of stuff. I just wonder why control plan doesn't include repair process. I thought control plan would contain all the main processes in the whole manufacturing which had an effect on the quality level of the final products. Because repair process is not a value-added process? Please help me out on this matter.
    PS I have been a QE for almost 8 years. It is a shame I am still troubled by this kind of problem.ㅜㅜ
     
  2. Serious Man

    Serious Man Active Member

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    APQP manual is a little bit old, but automotive management standards are more on time.
    So, when something is not required by manual, it can be required by standard.

    Be careful using word "repair", as there is second one related to correcting nonconforming product - "rework".
     
  3. judegu

    judegu Member

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    Thanks for your quick response, sir.
    After reading your reply, I did some digging in IATF16949.
    Here is what I got.
    In Section 8.7.1.4 Control of reworked product
    (As you said, I should avoid "repair" this word."Rework" should be more appropriate.)
    It is said:
    " The organization shall have documented process for rework confirmation in accordance with the control plan or other relevant documented information to verify compliance to original specifications."
    According the bold content, we actually should include "rework" process in the control plan, right? I am not sure whether "rework" and "rework confirmation" are the same thing or not. I am kind of a PQE. Not quite able to tell the differences between these two.
     
  4. Serious Man

    Serious Man Active Member

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    Process flow -> PFMEA -> Control plan -> Rework instruction -> Rework confirmation.
    Rework confirmation are activities aiming assuring us that rework activities really brought reworked parts to state of fully compliance with product specification.

    3 years ago Ford SQA visited us and ask about rework. We made an innocent face and questioning glance.
    He replied: "I am not against it, but put it in your flowchart, PFMEA and control plan, just to assure it would be carried out in a controlled manner."
     
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  5. judegu

    judegu Member

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    Thanks for sharing. Help me a lot. PS: Sometimes I just wonder why there is no further explanation stated in IATF for the newbie like me.
     
  6. ncwalker

    ncwalker Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to add - we always have our rework processes in our control plans and do not have problems with the OEMs over it. And, I've had suppliers do things like put multiple outsources in their control plans. For example, let's say they outsource heat treat and because of their business case, they have 3 vendors they use. Instead of tying them to one vendor, we get all three PPAP'd which can save some headache later. (It's easier to get this kind of thing done at program launch. People don't like changes after that). And to be clear - they had to approve all three outside suppliers. It wasn't like we approved one, and then just listed the other two. They all had to do the furnace mapping, etc. But ... the controls were all approved. And that allowed the supplier to switch at will. And yes, batch identification was maintained, we could grab suspect parts at any time.

    The point is, there's no requirement that the PFD, PFMEA and CP have to be linear. The requirement is that whatever is done is documented and appropriately controlled.
     

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