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Safe Launch Plan!

Discussion in 'APQP and PPAP' started by S1D3K1CK, Oct 13, 2020.

  1. S1D3K1CK

    S1D3K1CK Active Member

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    Hello, I am required to conduct an SLP on two parts that recently went through the PPAP process. The two parts have been submitted to the customer but have yet to be approved. Are there any templates or guidelines to help in understanding how to conduct an SLP, and is that part of the reason why the PPAP's haven't been completed by the customer?

    P.S. The PPAP's were submitted 2-3 days ago, before getting the notice of an SLP. The SLP is required in the next 5 days
     
  2. bkirch

    bkirch Active Member

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    My understanding of safe launch plans are that they are normally a customer specific requirement. I would think that your customer would be the best source on what would be needed for that plan.
     
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  3. qmr1976

    qmr1976 Well-Known Member

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    Generally, the customer includes SLP in the PPAP requirements beforehand, but given they are the customer they can pretty much require what they want above and beyond what the AIAG manual stipulates for PPAPs. (i.e. Customer Specific Requirements) Unless the customer requests a specific template to use for SLP, you can usually use whatever works for your company. I would suggest searching Google to find examples. Are the PPAPs submitted via a customer specific website or via email? If they have a specific platform to submit PPAP requests, they should be using that to communicate the status of the PPAP but I know that's not always the case.
     
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  4. S1D3K1CK

    S1D3K1CK Active Member

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    Yes, Their communication is via EPortal. If I am understanding correctly, the customer had someone retire in this department and now having a third party, out of the country, handle all the communications with our PPAP's. In this case, adding on an SLP request after our PPAP submission. I have done some google research and with what our customer requires plus, I believe that we would generally conduct 100% inspections, in production, within a certain duration period based on the EAU. I believe with what they are requiring, it should be easy enough to accomplish. (1. Pre-Production Control Plan(PPCP) 2. Safe Launch Plan which may include checklists, dimensional reports, work instructions, operator training, measurement system analysis reports, and other control documents as dictated by the PPCP. Submit by the due date or prior to the first pilot build shipment). It's my understanding that the plan itself is submitted but the actual documentation and results are retained until requested by the customer.

    P.S.My only concern is I just don't want to do it incorrectly. By the way, I think it would be better if we had a Core Team here but, The Quality Forum Online is my unofficial core team. :)
     
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  5. S1D3K1CK

    S1D3K1CK Active Member

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    Yes, that is my understanding also. I will reach out again to my customer contacts, hoping it produces results.
     
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  6. John C. Abnet

    John C. Abnet Well-Known Member

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    Good day @S1D3K1CK ;

    Consider this...
    These "SLP" are known by multiple names depending on who is referring to it (e.g. "quiet launch, etc...). I would assume your organization already has some type of "quiet launch" protocol. If so, I would assume (hope) that this protocol was developed to be an effective and beneficial tool for YOUR organization (which includes protecting the customer) instead of simply another cumbersome box to check. If this is the case, then why not simply provide and apply your organization's current/effective protocol?

    If you need to start from "scratch", GM has a program they refer to as GP-12 which you may consider emulating.

    GP 12 requires (paraphrasing)...
    1) a pre-launch control plan, which has increased sampling requirements applied.
    This is usually required to be applied for 30 days (the goal is to see if the production control plan will be sufficient based on the GP-12 activity/sampling results.)
    2) specified "off line" containment/sampling areas
    3) standardized work instructions for any increased sampling.
    4) Documented evidence of execution and results.
    5) etc...


    Hope this helps.

    Be well.
     
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  7. S1D3K1CK

    S1D3K1CK Active Member

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    If my organization has some type of protocol, I am not aware, and reaching out to management doesn't seem to help due to them not knowing what an SLP is. The only thing I can think of is maybe our contingency plan? Since we do not do design and rely on customer designed drawings, I think we would have to start from scratch as you stated. As our Quality Manager, I am responsible for maintaining all of the PPAP information, whatever they require. But with having no educational background, only OJT, I get results only by research and I have been stumped besides what has been provided here.
     
  8. John C. Abnet

    John C. Abnet Well-Known Member

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    Understood. The goal is to do something that actually works (which may be to do nothing beyond your designed processes).

    As other's mentioned, if your organization has no experience/familiarity then reach out to the customer. As @bkirch mentioned, if the customer is asking for something such as "this", then it is likely they have and dictate what "this" needs to be.
    (Has your organization been provided a "supplier handbook" from your customer? )

    Be well
     
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  9. S1D3K1CK

    S1D3K1CK Active Member

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    Our customer has provided access to their "Quality Handbook". I am currently communicating with the customer to gather the needed information for this SLP. One thing I was wondering though, is a Pre-Production Control Plan (PPCP) the same as a Pre-Launch Control Plan (PLCP), just worded differently?
     
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  10. qmr1976

    qmr1976 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, same concept just different terminology. According to the APQP AIAG manual, there are 3 categories for a control plan. Prototype, Pre-Launch and Production. Their definition of pre-launch is a description of the dimensional measurements, material and performance tests that will occur after Prototype and before normal production, so I think Pre-production would fall into this same category.
     
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  11. Miner

    Miner Moderator Staff Member

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    I have been out of automotive for awhile, but pre-launch used to mean pilot production or start of saleable vehicles. I would include pre-production in that.
     
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  12. S1D3K1CK

    S1D3K1CK Active Member

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    Thanks. I figured it was the same meaning. Just never heard of a PPCP before.
     
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  13. Steven Severt

    Steven Severt Member

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    We use GM's GP-12 as the basis for our Safe Launch activity. Essentially, we create standardized work and dedicate manpower to complete Safe Launch inspections for new products. We have that manpower complete all inspections according to that standardized work and log any rejects that they find. They are the final inspectors that pack the good product during this time, with everything passing through their Safe Launch inspections. For each criterion that they are inspecting, we must have 30 days without finding for it to be removed from their standardized work and inspection. Once all items have been removed - as in, all items have been found to have been eliminated and defect-free for 30 days at Safe Launch - we can end the Safe Launch program.
     
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  14. ncwalker

    ncwalker Well-Known Member

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    To me, the concept of pre-launch control plan as defined as a "normal" control plan, but with more frequent checks is a horrifyingly bad approach.

    Safe Launch/Early Containment/GP12 - whatever you want to call it - is a TEST of your control plan.

    The concept is this:
    1) Run a new process, as designed, with the production control plan.
    2) In the early phase, identify key things to check and check the output of the process in a separate area, do not disturb the intended process. (This is Safe Launch)

    Then either:
    1) The Safe Launch doesn't find any defects, which means the as designed production control plan and all its trappings is doing a good job.
    2) The Safe Launch DOES find defects - in which case you need to re-evaluate your production control plan as to why defects escaped and adjust it permanently.

    Why would you run "extra checks" in a pre-launch control plan while under test? What would be the point of that? Think about it - what then happens when you get through safe launch, relax your checks to a production control plan, and then ship a bad part because you have not vetted the production (relaxed) control plan?

    You need to go to the customer and say:
    1) We don't do special pre-production control plans because we like to test the intended control plan (using my logic above)
    2) Here's what we intend to check: And offer him things you should be checking. In the list should be:
    a) Definitely anything the customer has marked as a key characteristic in the contract
    b) Optionally anything that has a low capability that you are controlling statistically
    c) Optionally anything that you know is difficult to control from your knowledge of the process

    It can be a pain. The reason two of them are listed optionally is that they are extremely important for YOU. You should want to vet your process design with a Safe Launch. But ... if you report them out, you could be 100% checking them for a while. Option a may get your customer off your back, I'd open with that first then add if they ask for more. But definitely do b and c internally. Much cheaper than a sort later.

    It is also a good idea to use different personnel than the normal production people to make the safe launch checks if at all possible. This will identify if any measurements need finagling above and beyond normal usage of the gages. That's dangerous.
     
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