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Management Review Inputs (9.3.2) - "monitoring and measurement results" vs. "process performance"

Discussion in 'ISO 9001:2015 - Quality Management Systems' started by Randy A. Kaczynski, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. Randy A. Kaczynski

    Randy A. Kaczynski Member

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    Referring to this clause 9.3.2, what is the difference between "monitoring and measurement results" and "process performance"?

    9.3.2 Management review inputs
    The management review shall be planned and carried out taking into consideration:
    c) information on the performance and effectiveness of the quality management system, including trends in:
    3) PROCESS PERFORMANCE and conformity of products and services;
    5) MONITORING AND MEASUREMENT RESULTS;
     
  2. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    ISO 9000:2015 (the updated definitions standard) defines performance as a measurable result (the word "result" unhelpfully adding to the confusion) and adds a note that it can be quantitative or qualitative, and a second note that it can can relate to the management of activities, processes, products, services, systems or organizations.

    So we can think of 9.3.2c3 as a reporting of output of the "Do" phase in the process approach, where processes are actually running.

    9.3.2.c5 uses the same terminology found in 9.1.1, in which the organization determines (a) what needs to be monitored and measured, as well as the (b) methods for monitoring and measurement, plus analysis and evaluation and (d) when the results are analyzed and evaluated. This is the "Check" (or "Study", for Deminguites) phase of the process approach.

    So, in 9.3.2.c5 Management is now looking at results. What are the performance data telling us? ISO 9001:2015 uses the term result throughout but ISO 9000:2015 does not define result, so I referred to the Free Dictionary online which defines result as
    All of this fancy explanation could be boiled down to a simple expression: performance is how something goes, whereas a result is an outcome.

    I hope this makes sense!
     
  3. Randy A. Kaczynski

    Randy A. Kaczynski Member

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    I have come to the conclusion that these two MR inputs are generally of the same type, with slightly different focuses, that is –

    9.3.2.c.3 (PROCESS PERFORMANCE & conformity of products & services) specifically refers to product/service realization processes,

    9.3.2.c.5 (MONITORING & MEASUREMENT RESULTS) refers to necessary QMS support processes.
     
  4. Jennifer Kirley

    Jennifer Kirley Moderator Staff Member

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    I would have agreed with you except the Note in ISO 9000:2015, 3.7.8 explains that performance can refer to processes not limited to production of products/delivery of service.

    To put it simply, my understanding is:

    9.3.2c3 = output data from process measurements (indication of performance)
    9.3.2c5 = what the data mean (results)

    I welcome others to chime in here, as I do not wish to lead anyone astray.
     
  5. tony s

    tony s Well-Known Member

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    I think there are inputs in 9.3.2c that don't need to be taken as distinct from each other or will require separate evidences for each. For example, an organization has a quality target of Average Customer Satisfaction Rating to not lower than 3.5 (where 5 is the highest and 1 is the lowest. The following inputs under 9.3.2c are applicable:
    1) customer satisfaction and feedback from relevant interested parties;
    2) the extent to which quality objectives have been met;
    3) process performance and conformity of products and services;
    5) monitoring and measurement results​
     
  6. askartsolutions

    askartsolutions Member

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    One way to answer Randy's question is by providing an analogy.
    Admittedly, there is some overlap in the relationship between QMS process performance indicators and measurement and monitoring, but here is my take on it:

    Process Performance

    Say you provide a mini-van shuttle service between downtown Toronto and downtown Montreal. The trip takes an average of 6 hours. Your performance objective would be to leave at a scheduled time and arrive at a scheduled time for either destination within a ± 15 minutes time frame. Say for discussion purposes you want to achieve a 95 % on-time process performance for your fleet of mini-vans that make a total of 100 such trips a month. So you would hit your process performance objective if you were on time within this criteria for 95 of these trips. As per clause 9.3.2c.3 You would track such performance monthly and do a trend analysis to determine process performance effectiveness for management review presentation and discussion

    Monitoring and measurement (MM)

    Monitoring is checking the operational status of a process parameter and measurement is assigning a numerical value to the process parameter or characteristic being monitored. Let’s apply this to our shuttle service.

    In order to achieve your overall process objective as discussed above, you must control (i.e. monitor and measure) various process operational parameters. You would monitor your fuel gauge, your speedometer (both have numerical values) and perhaps a GPS (directional value). You will monitor and perhaps record the readings from time to time (say when you stop for gas or a bathroom break) of these operational parameters to determine your progress (capability, speed and direction) in achieving your process objective of reaching in 6 hours. You need to monitor all three to determine your progress as just one will not give you the full picture. You could be going too slow, run out of fuel, or worse yet headed in the wrong direction!

    Other such operational controls could include maintenance and driver availability, etc. These process operational parameters must be monitored and measured as needed to ensure achievement of overall shuttle on-time performance. An airline would be an even better example of this analogy. Pilots keep a detailed log of dozens of such MM parameters for thousands of flights a year which are analyzed a hundred times over by technical and management staff to improve airline performance and safety. Still, how many times have flights been delayed due to maintenance or flight crew availability issues?

    Again you would track trends in # of occurrences of fuel outages, maintenance and other process operational issues and do a trend analysis for management review purpose. From an operational standpoint most organizations know what to monitor and measure and may use different terminology. So don't ISO lingo or auditors detract you from doing what's working for you.

    This analogy has been taken from my eBook "Understanding ISO 9001:2015". Then again, there are other ways of interpreting it.
     
    Qualmx and tony s like this.

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