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Incoming inspection for screws

Discussion in 'IATF 16949:2016 - Automotive Quality Systems' started by Justyna, Oct 19, 2017.

  1. Justyna

    Justyna New Member

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    Hey!
    I have some question about incoming inspection. If I messed up the threads i apologize in advance.
    Could someone share/tell some details about what we should actually control when it come about screws? I know that the most importatnt is thread size lenght of screw and shaft dia. What about the head ? On the technical drwing I have only the max. dia.
    I am asking about it because I have racived a new batch of screws from my supplier and the head of it is different than it was in old ones. One was more was more rectangular now it is round, and has a smaller diameter so that it can be seen with the naked eye. However, this does not affect functionality.
    This is my problem but additionally I would like to talk about how should the proper screw control looks like to satisfy the automotive customer? Does anyone have any experience?
     
  2. John C. Abnet

    John C. Abnet Active Member

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    Good day Justyna--welcome to the forum;
    Regardless of the product, the first step is to understand the "rule". In this case, the rule will likely be a drawing ("blueprint") or standard (SAE, JIS, HES etc...). These will provide the required specifications for the product. Without understanding your customer's specific requirements, drawing specifics, etc..., it is difficult to provide specifics to your question. However, you should (must) be able to know the "rule" so you can measure your product and accept/reject based on that rule.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. normzone

    normzone Well-Known Member

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    Fasteners is an entire world unto itself. Just the head style alone is an issue, much less the complexities of threads.

    As [John C. Abnet] says, begin with the specification, and go from there.
     
  4. Justyna

    Justyna New Member

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    Hello,

    of course I started with the technical drawing but in this case the head has only a max. diameter and max. height.
    The supplier states that while it is within these assumptions nothing happens that the screws look completely different.
    I wonder if anyone had a similar experience?

    Regarding screw incoming control itself, I wonder how do you do it? With a slider? test assembly or maybe a special device? Is it only visual inspection?
     
  5. John C. Abnet

    John C. Abnet Active Member

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    Good day Justyna;
    It sounds as if you are procuring these fasteners from a supplier (external provider). If the drawing/requirements provided to that supplier only state "max...", then as long as they are meeting that "max..." requirement, there is no non-conformance per the technical drawing.

    However, the other condition (beyond technical drawing specification) you should be challenging your supplier on is process control. Considering this discussion is within the IATF 16949 forum, then the next question is...what process and product characteristic commitments are stated on the control plan ? The next/second "rule" (contract) that the supplier must meet is the control plan commitments. I would next look at that and compare their actual process and resultant product characteristics to those stated on the control plan.


    Hope this helps.
     
  6. Golfman25

    Golfman25 Well-Known Member

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    Be careful. The drawing may be some general spec. someone pulled off the web or out of a catalog. It may not show min/max tolerances or anything, just general dimensions. If your checking parts to print, you'll really need a manufacturing type of drawing.
     

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