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8.4.2.3 Supplier quality management system developement .

Discussion in 'IATF 16949:2016 - Automotive Quality Systems' started by Elçin Mert, Jul 13, 2021.

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  1. Elçin Mert

    Elçin Mert New Member

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    hello;
    We are buying a YYY material from ABC company. ABC company is only a distributor that are not produce YYY material they only sell materials. DEF company is producer of the YYY material.
    What we do for 8.4.2.3 for bot company

    1) Should both company have ISO9001?
    2) Should we audit or evealuate both company?

    Regards
     
  2. John C. Abnet

    John C. Abnet Well-Known Member

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    Good day @Elçin Mert and welcome to the site.
    Your organization's responsibility is to manage your direct supplier. In this case, your direct supplier is "YYY". IATF that you ensure your supplier is ISO 9001 certified, at minimum.

    You have no DIRECT responsibility for "DEF", beyond ensuring that "YYY" is managing "DEF", including ensuring that safety, statutory, regulatory requirements are cascaded through the entire supply chain.

    Hope this helps.
    Be well.
     
  3. Andy Nichols

    Andy Nichols Moderator Staff Member

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    @John C. Abnet is correct. The distributor is your supplier and your responsibility in respect to IATF ends there. However, if the product you get from the distributor is vitally important and it's been demonstrated the quality isn't consistent - and has caused you problems - which normal routes of corrective actions with the distributor have failed to improve, you have a number of options to pursue in making sure things get back under control. You may need to work with the distributor (as John suggests they should be at least ISO 9001 Certified and yet they are ineffective with corrective actions) to get things done right, or there might even be a case to go straight to the OEM.
     
    John C. Abnet likes this.

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